Huntington Beach

Welcome to Cash 4 Used Cars!

Here at Cash 4 Used Cars, we have earned a great reputation in Southern California for providing the most cash for any type of vehicle. If you want to avoid the hassle of sales pitches, dealerships and extra fees, our trained professionals make the selling process quick and convenient. With over 20 years of experience, we stand out in the car industry and pride ourselves in providing excellent customer service. Our focus is saving you time and making you money!

Contact Cash 4 Used Cars for Cash 4 Cars, Cash 4 Used Cars, Cash For Cars, Cash For My Car, Cash For Used Cars, Cash For Your Car, Sell Car For Cash, Sell My Car, Sell My Car Fast, Sell My Car For Cash, Sell Used Car, Sell Your Car, and We Buy Cars. Proudly supporting the areas of Anaheim, Buena Park, Costa Mesa, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Huntington Beach, Irvine, Lake Forest, Mission Viejo, Newport Beach, Orange, Santa Ana, Tustin, Westminster, Yorba Linda, and surrounding areas.

CONTACT US TODAY TO SELL NOW

Contact Cash 4 Used Cars for Cash 4 Cars in Huntington Beach, Cash 4 Used Cars in Huntington Beach, Cash For Cars in Huntington Beach, Cash For My Car in Huntington Beach, Cash For Used Cars in Huntington Beach, Cash For Your Car in Huntington Beach, Sell Car For Cash in Huntington Beach, Sell My Car in Huntington Beach, Sell My Car Fast in Huntington Beach, Sell My Car For Cash in Huntington Beach, Sell Used Car in Huntington Beach, Sell Your Car in Huntington Beach, We Buy Cars in Huntington Beach, and in surrounding areas.


Below is some general information about Huntington Beach:

Huntington Beach is a seaside city in Orange County in Southern California. According to the 2010 census, the city population was 189,992; making it the largest beach city in Orange County in terms of population. The estimate for 2012 shows that the population is 189,707. It is bordered by the Pacific Ocean on the southwest, by Seal Beach on the northwest, by Costa Mesa on the east, by Newport Beach on the southeast, by Westminster on the north, and by Fountain Valley on the northeast. Huntington Beach (aka HB) is known for its long 8.5-mile (13.7 kilometers) stretch of sandy beach, mild climate, excellent surfing and beach culture. The ocean waves are enhanced by a natural effect caused by the edge-diffraction of open ocean swells around the island of Catalina. Swells generated predominantly from the North Pacific in Winter and from a combination of Southern Hemisphere storms and hurricanes in the Summer focus on Huntington Beach creating consistent surf all year long, thus giving HB the title ‘Surf City, USA’.

Construction of any kind on the beach is prohibited without a vote of the people, allowing Huntington Beach to retain its natural tie to the ocean rather than having the view obscured by residential and commercial developments. Between Downtown Huntington Beach and Huntington Harbour lies a large marshy wetland, much of which is protected within the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve. A $110 million restoration of the wetlands was completed in 2006. The Reserve is popular with bird watchers and photographers. South of Downtown, the Talbert, Brookhurst and Magnolia Marshes, which lie across the street from Huntington State Beach, had restoration completed in 2010. The northern and southern beaches (Bolsa Chica State Beach and Huntington State Beach, respectively) are state parks. Only the central beach (Huntington City Beach) is maintained by the city. Camping and RVs are permitted here, and popular campsites for the Fourth of July and the Surfing Championships must be reserved many months in advance. Bolsa Chica State Beach is actually a sand bar fronting the Bolsa Bay and Bolsa Chica State Ecological Reserve.

Huntington Beach sits above a large natural fault structure containing oil. Although the oil is mostly depleted, extraction continues at a slow rate, and still provides significant local income. There are only two off-shore extraction facilities left, however, and the day is not far off when oil production in the city will cease and tourism will replace it as the primary revenue source for resident industry. The city is discussing closing off Main Street to cars from PCH through the retail shopping and restaurant areas, making it a pedestrian zone only. Other shopping centers include Bella Terra, built on the former Huntington Center site, and Old World Village, a German-themed center. Huntington Beach has an off-shore oil terminus for the tankers that support the Alaska Pipeline. The terminus pipes run inland to a refinery in Santa Fe Springs. Huntington Beach also has the Gothard-Talbert terminus for the Orange County portion of the pipeline running from the Chevron El Segundo refinery. Several hotels have been constructed on the inland side of Pacific Coast Highway (State Route 1) within view of the beach, just southeast of the pier.

The downtown district includes an active art center, a colorful shopping district, and the International Surfing Museum. This district was also the home of the Golden Bear from 1929Ð1986. Originally a fine dining restaurant opened by Harry Bakre in 1929, the Golden Bear became a nightclub in 1963 and hosted famous-name entertainment until it was demolished in 1986. The list of artists who performed there includes BB King, Janis Joplin, Steve Martin, Charles Bukowski, The Ramones and Stevie Ray Vaughan. The Huntington Beach Pier stretches from Main Street into the Pacific Ocean. At the end of the pier is a Ruby’s Diner. The Surf Theatre, which was located one block north of the pier, gained fame in the 1960s and 1970s for showing independent surf films such as The Endless Summer and Five Summer Stories. The Surf Theatre was owned and operated by Hugh Larry Thomas from 1961 until it was demolished in 1989. A newer version of The Surf Theatre is now closed, but the Huntington Beach International Surfing Museum has preserved its memory with ongoing screenings of surfing movies once shown at a Huntington Beach theater and the original metal SURF sign.

The city was featured in the TruTV series Ocean Force: Huntington Beach. Also, the city is mentioned in the Beach Boys song Surfin’ Safari, in Jan and Dean’s Surf Route 101 and in Surfer Joe by The Surfaris. Live cameras are set up at the Huntington Beach Pier and shown on screens at the California-themed Hollister apparel stores. The store pays the city for the cameras, with the money used to fund marine safety equipment. The cameras are also used by lifeguards. The public television station KOCE-TV operates from the Golden West College campus, in conjunction with the Golden West College Media Arts program. Two weekly newspapers cover Huntington Beach: The Huntington Beach Independent and The Wave Section of The Orange County Register.

Source: Huntington Beach on Wikipedia